Curse of the Monkey God
film

Curse of the Monkey God

In 2011 Steve and Bill Benenson assembled the world’s foremost specialists in radar mapping to scan the impenetrable La Mosquitia jungle. What they unearthed exceeded their wildest expectations, but what the jungle unleashed, in turn, was more debilitating than any of them had bargained for. Was this the CURSE OF THE MONKEY GOD?

Making A Killing
Partner Film

Making A Killing

Making A Killing: Guns, Greed, and The NRA tells the story of how guns, and the billions of dollars generated from them, affect the lives of everyday Americans. The film exposes how powerful gun companies and the NRA are resisting responsible legislation for the sake of profit – and thereby putting people in danger.

The Hadza: Last of the First
film

The Hadza: Last of the First

The Hadza, East Africa’s last remaining true hunter-gatherers, have lived sustainably on their land near the Rift Valley, birthplace of humanity, for over 50,000 years. Now the group, considered to be the oldest population in East Africa, faces grave challenges to their way of life.

Mister Johnson
Partner Film

Mister Johnson

Mister Johnson is an acclaimed film about the effects of colonialism on the individual. Based on a 1939 novel by Joyce Cary, it is a graceful, heartfelt drama about the limits of idealism, starring Maynard Eziashi in a performance that earned him the Berlin Film Festival’s Silver Bear for best actor.

Dirt! The Movie
film

Dirt! The Movie

Dirt! The Movie was an official selection for the 2009 Sundance Film Festival and won several awards, including the best documentary award at the 2009 Visions/Voices Environmental Film Festival and the “Best film for our future” award at the 2009 Mendocino Film Festival.

Diamond Rivers
film

Diamond Rivers

Diamond Rivers is the story of diamond prospecting and global change, seen through the eyes of a seasoned diamond prospector, Geraldo Santos Neves, in the Sertao of Bahia, Brazil. This documentary was featured on PBS through WNET New York and inspired by Bill Benenson’s time in north eastern Brazil as a Peace Corps volunteer.

The Marginal Way
film

The Marginal Way

The Marginal Way, once an old Native American trail, is now a famous south coastal Maine attraction. Like the trail, the film roams through the Ogunquit Village, following the artists, fishermen, hippies, hermits, and the pensioners who call this place home.

Easter Island Rises
film

Easter Island Rises

Easter Island Rises was Bill Benenson’s directorial debut. Shot in 1970 with the support of The International Monuments Fund, the film focuses on the shipment of one of the famous Easter Island moai statues to the US, where it was displayed at Seagram’s Plaza in New York City.